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Greek Parades - Manhattan NYC

Greek Parades Photos, Stories & Events


Greek Parades & Greek Holidays Manhattan

Greek Traditions Celebrated in Manhattan NYC

May 2017 / Upper East Side Neighborhood UES / Manhattan Parades & Holidays in Manhattan / Manhattan Buzz NYC.

This section is dedicated to Greek parades in Manhattan and Greek holidays in Manhattan.  There's a large Greek population in the NYC metro area which makes obtaining authentic Greek food and culture accessible.

The photo at right is a shot of the Greek parade making its way up 5th Avenue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

Click here to read reports and view photos of the Greek Parade & Greek Holidays in Manhattan.


Greek Independence Day Parade NYC

Greeks Celebrate Independence From Ottoman Empire

greek parade manhattan nycMarch 31, 2015 / Upper East Side Neighborhood / Manhattan Parades / Gotham Buzz. In 1821 a Greek Bishop tore down the flag of the reigning Ottomans and erected the Greek flag atop his church. This action and this moment is considered by many historians to be the official beginning of the Greek fight for independence from the Ottoman Turks. The Ottomans had ruled Greece for about four centuries.

Fast forward to the 21st century in New York City and the Greeks are on the march once again. The Evzones Presidential Guard marched near the front of the parade. They were preceded by a cadre of government officials including the Governor (who I missed) and the Mayor, as well as government officials from the Greek neighborhood of Astoria in Queens.

The parade was organized by the Federation of Hellenic Societies which is an inclusive group of a good number of different Greek cultural and civic groups in the tri-state area. The photo above right shows a group from the University of Thessaloniki in Greece marching along the east side of Central Park on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.

It was a beautiful day as I made my way toward Central Park ... more to come later including a photo slide show.


Greek Independence Day Parade In Manhattan NYC

things to do in manhattanMarch 30, 2014 / Things To Do In Manhattan / Manhattan Buzz NYC.

It was a cloudy day with highs in the 50's and a high probability of sporadic rain for the Sunday of the Greek Independence Day Parade in Manhattan.

But the Greeks are intrepid and a good crowd lined Fifth Avenue to watch the Greek Independence Day Parade which began at 64th Street and Fifth Avenue and marched up to 79th Street.

The parade encapsulated a number of historic moments of the Grecian past, including the battle of Themopylae when King Leonidas of Sparta lead the federation of Greek city states against the mighty Persian Empire of Xerxes. The Persians had plans to conquer all of Greece to make it their own, while the Greeks fought to remain a conglomeration of city states.

The small Grecian force held off a Persian army many times their size, in one of history's great last stands.

Click here to see photos of the Greek Independence Day Parade in NYC.


Greek Independence Day Parade NYC

Greek Diaspora To Converge On UES Manhattan

greek parade nyc greek parade manhattanMarch 23, 2015 / Midtown & Upper East Side / UES Neighborhood / Manhattan Parades / Gotham Buzz. The Greek Independence Day Parade returns to Manhattan on March 29th at 1.45 pm begins on Fifth Avenue at 65th Street and marches up to 79th Street on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

The parade celebrates Greece's struggle for independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1821, when legend has it that Bishop Germanos of Patras erected the Greek flag in defiance of the ruling Turks and the insurgency began.

The parade is organized by the Federation of Hellenic Societies of Greater New York which is located in Astoria Queens. The photo above was taken at the 2013 Greek Independence Day Parade in Manhattan.

A longer story w/ photos is coming soon.


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Greek Easter Traditions In Manhattan

Easter Weekend At St. John's In Gramercy Park

manhattan neighborhoodsApril 21, 2014 / Manhattan Neighborhoods / Gramercy Park Neighborhood / Midtown Buzz. Friday evening I made my way to St. John's Orthodox Church in Gramercy Park. There was a Holy Friday church service at 7 pm which was to be followed by a Holy Friday procession through the streets of Manhattan by the parishoners with a large cross and the floral covered epitaphios.

I entered the church was was packed with a standing room only crowd to see what I might see. Incense was burning, leaving a scent wafting through the air, recollective of an age old tradition coming from thousands of miles and thousands of years gone by.

Eventually the crowd made its way into the street which had been cordoned off by the NYPD. Candles were lit and distributed amongst the crowd. And then the parish priest, accompanied by the cross and the epitaphios appeared. We headed west on 17th Street toward Irving Place as the procession began.

In the photo to your right you can see the Greek Orthodox Holy Friday procession of St. John's Greek Orthodox Church in Gramercy Park. A bit to the right of the cross is the red and white, floral-covered, dome-shaped epitaphios. We'll post more photos and a bit more information later in the day / week.



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